Reports: UK Regional Branches

This page provides space for reports and news of events held by UK Regional Branches.

The papers have not necessarily been peer-group edited.

London/SE England Branch
Visit to Rothamsted Research: October 2014

22 members of the TAA attended a visit to Rothamsted, a Corporate member of TAA. It was well organised by Simon Vaughan, head of International Programmes. Professor John Pickett gave a first class presentation of impressive work on the push - pull crop protection programme in Kenya.

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Globalisation a game of consequences. By Jim Waller 29/8/2014

Broadly globalisation is to "make worldwide in scope or application" but the term became popular in relation to the opening of international financial markets and business activities in the 1980-90s. Globalisation began with Mans first emigrations from Africa and the subsequent development and spread of agriculture, trade and urbanisation. The first significant problem to emerge as a consequence of early globalisation was the black death/plague caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, an enzootic of ground rodents and their fleas in central Asia. This was probably carried along the silk route and spread rapidly in densely populated cites of Europe, in effect human monocultures, killing an estimated 50% of the European population in the 14th century. Since then, other diseases of man, livestock and crops have continued to spread mostly through the agency of human activity linked to increasing globalisation.

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Can voluntary sustainability standards incentivize smallholder adoption? - The case of rice

9th Prof. Hugh Bunting Memorial Lecture By Wyn Ellis, PhD UNEP / Sustainable Rice Platform & Tropical Agriculture Association, University of Reading 9 June 2014

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Northern England
Land degradation seminar 9th March 2016

Joint TAA- Univ of Newcastle Soil Science Society seminar. Land degradation is the reduction in the capacity of the land to provide ecosystem goods and services and assure its functions over a period of time. Land degradation affects large areas and many people in dryland regions. Changes in land use through ploughing, heavy grazing and deforestation all leave the soil highly vulnerable to wind erosion particularly during severe droughts. Heavy grazing around water points or during long droughts prevents or delays the regrowth of vegetation or favours only unpalatable shrubs.

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Land degradation seminar 9th March 2016

Joint TAA- Univ of Newcastle Soil Science Society seminar. Land degradation is the reduction in the capacity of the land to provide ecosystem goods and services and assure its functions over a period of time. Land degradation affects large areas and many people in dryland regions. Changes in land use through ploughing, heavy grazing and deforestation all leave the soil highly vulnerable to wind erosion particularly during severe droughts. Heavy grazing around water points or during long droughts prevents or delays the regrowth of vegetation or favours only unpalatable shrubs.


Land degradation seminar 9th March 2016

Joint TAA- Univ of Newcastle Soil Science Society seminar. Land degradation is the reduction in the capacity of the land to provide ecosystem goods and services and assure its functions over a period of time. Land degradation affects large areas and many people in dryland regions. Changes in land use through ploughing, heavy grazing and deforestation all leave the soil highly vulnerable to wind erosion particularly during severe droughts. Heavy grazing around water points or during long droughts prevents or delays the regrowth of vegetation or favours only unpalatable shrubs.


Crop protection: advances and challenges (8th Dec 2014)

For farmers around the world, tackling crop pest problems in a safe and sustainable way is a major challenge. Currently between 30-40% of crops are lost to pests, which exacerbates the problem of food insecurity and hunger. The food system is under pressure from climate change, environmental degradation, population growth, rising energy prices, rising demand for meat and dairy products, competition for land from biofuels, and urbanization. We cannot afford for these losses to continue, but can we do about it?

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Scotland Branch
Curry lunch Discussion

A curry lunch was held at Mother India in Edinburgh on 12 Aug 2016, as the first informal TAA meeting to take place in Scotland. It was well received. After eating we had a short discussion on ?What is the role of TAA Scotland??. Having defined some priorities, future actions were discussed.

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Survey& Inaugural Meeting 25/9/15

Having conducted a survey of members' needs, the TAA Scotland Branch held their first meeting on Friday 25 September 2015 at Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation.

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Southwest England Branch
Soil - where the answer lies

The TAA Southwest Branch organised a full day seminar at the Royal Agriculture University, Cirencester on 15th October 2015, as part of the UN Year of the Soil 2015. Introduction by John Wibberley, and papers by David Hopkins on Healthy Soils challenges for research & development; Jane Rickson on Soil degradation & Ecosystem Security; Alan Stapleton on Travels with an auger: tropical soil diversity in practice; Tony Reynolds, on Soil management: lessons from and for Conservation Farming; Richard Baines on Reducing Soil Erosion through improved agricultural practices among smallholder farmers in Tanzania; Charles Hartley on Soil Conservation via Tropical Tree Crop Management. Followed by an active panel discussion.

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Dairy Farming Seminar, March 2015

Papers presented were: 1) Overview of Trends and Issues in Dairying Globally by Prof John Wibberley. 2) Cows in Context with particular reference to East Africa. Richard Alford. 3) Practical Progress for Dairy Farmers. Duncan Forbes, MD of Kingshay Farming and Conservation. 4) Our Story in Dairying. Family Farm Viability and Succession. John and Sally Down 5) The Long View; experiences and strategies for staying in dairying. John Alvis.

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